Leaf Structure  

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Teacher Candidate:_Mary Anne Lake_____________                                          Unit Topic:___Photosynthesis______________________

 

Essential Question(s):____What is it about plants that allow them to turn sunlight into usable energy for us?

 

Lesson Number:__1______________________                    Approximate Time:____3 days____________________

 

State Standard and

 Performance Indicator

Objectives (Utilize Bloom’s)

Acceptable Evidence and

Type of Assessment

Standard 4 Key Idea 5 Performance Indicator 1b: Plant cells and some one-celled organisms contain chloroplasts, the site of photosynthesis.  The process of photosynthesis uses solar energy to combine the inorganic molecules carbon dioxide and water into energy-rich organic compounds (e.g., glucose) and release oxygen to the environment.

 

1.  Identify the structures and organelles of a leaf and understand that the chloroplasts are the central organelle of photosynthesis.

 

 

1.  The student will complete a worksheet identifying the structures and organelles in a leaf. (Formative)

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.  Analyze a leaf extraction to determine the various types of chlorophyll and accessory pigments present in chloroplasts.

 

2.  Complete a chromatography lab that separates the types of chlorophyll and accessory pigments into different color bands.  Completed data and observations will provide the evidence.  (Formative)

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.  The students will compare the different types of chlorophyll with different wavelengths of light in the visible spectrum and deduce why leaves have more than one type of chlorophyll.

 

 

 

3.  The student will complete a lab report identifying the types of chlorophyll observed in the leaf extraction. In the conclusion the student will discuss the importance of having more than one type of chlorophyll.(Summative)

 


 

 

Lesson Title/Number

 

Photosynthesis

 

Lesson 1

 

Lesson Question (s)

 

 

What are the parts of a leaf?

How do the various parts of the leaf allow it to capture energy?

 

State Standards and Performance Indicators

 

 

Standard 4 Key Idea 5 Performance Indicator 1b: Plant cells and some one-celled organisms contain chloroplasts, the site of photosynthesis.  The process of photosynthesis uses solar energy to combine the inorganic molecules carbon dioxide and water into energy-rich organic compounds (e.g., glucose) and release oxygen to the environment.

 

Lesson Objectives

(Bloom’s Taxonomy)

 

  

 

 

 

Acceptable Evidence

 

 

 

Identify the structures and organelles of a leaf and understand that the chloroplasts are the central organelle of photosynthesis.

Analyze a leaf extraction to determine the various types of chlorophyll and accessory pigments present in chloroplasts.

The students will compare the different types of chlorophyll with different wavelengths of light in the visible spectrum and deduce why leaves have more than one type of chlorophyll.

The student will complete a worksheet identifying the structures and organelles in a leaf. (Formative)

Complete a chromatography lab that separates the types of chlorophyll and accessory pigments into different color bands.  Completed data and observations will provide the evidence.  (Formative)

The student will complete a lab report identifying the types of chlorophyll observed in the leaf extraction. In the conclusion the student will discuss the importance of having more than one type of chlorophyll. (Summative)

Bell Ringer and Prior Knowledge Tap – this can be together or separate

 

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Procedure –

teacher input, modeling, guided practice, independent practice, and/or activities

 

*Accommodations for learning modalities are required.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The students will observe a leaf and make observations about the structure.  They will also write down any functions/structures they already know.  This will also serve as a pretest for the lesson.

 

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Before any instruction is given the students will set up a whole class experiment using plants.  The teacher will review the instructions verbally with the class (Verbal).

The teacher will select students to set up the experiment step by step as a demonstration in class (Visual/Kinesthetic/Tactile).

Three plants will be used to examine the importance of leaf anatomy to the life of the plant. 

  • One plant will be the control and will have no treatment
  • One plant will have petroleum jelly spread on the TOP of the leaves
  • The third plant will have petroleum jelly spread on the bottom of the leaves.

The plants will be put in the same area of the classroom and watered at the same time with the same amount of water.

The students will record the parameters of the experiment using the provided worksheet and make predictions as to what will happen to the plants and engage in a whole class discussion as to why they made the predictions they did. (Auditory/Visual/Kinesthetic/Tactile)

Using a PowerPoint presentation, the teacher will present a direct instruction lesson on leaf anatomy.  The teacher will explore the function of each part of the leaf as it relates to photosynthesis. (Auditory/Visual)

The PowerPoint will be printed as handouts and used for the students to take notes during the direct instruction.  (Visual/Kinesthetic/Tactile)

The students will begin working on a worksheet summarizing the anatomy and function of the organelles of the leaf.  The worksheet may be completed in class.  If not, then the remainder shall be homework. (Visual/Kinesthetic/Tactile)

The teacher will distribute a lab handout.  (Visual)

The teacher will introduce a lab that will allow the students to make the connection between the colors of leaves and the amount of the sun’s energy they capture. The instructions will be read from the handout and a brief video describing the procedure and showing expected results will be shown. (Visual/Auditory)

The students will be grouped into teams of 4.  Each group will assign one of the following jobs to each team member:  Manager, Reporter, Recorder and Lab Technician.  The job descriptions are detailed on the lab handout.  The teacher will provide different leaf types (Maple, Oak, Birch, etc.) for the students to use.

The students will conduct the experiment per the instructions on the handout. (Visual/Kinesthetic/Tactile)

The students will record the data and draw conclusions as to the number of different pigments in the leaf. (Kinesthetic/Tactile)

Once the students have collected the data and cleaned up the lab area, they will return to their desks/tables for discussion. (Auditory)  The data will be collected and reviewed by the teacher for completeness and accuracy as a check for understanding.

The teacher will lead a discussion about the findings including allowing the students to discover that there are at least four different pigments located in a leaf.  (Auditory)

The teacher will then continue the direct instruction lesson explaining why there were four different pigments identified and how those pigments capture the sunlight to be used by the plant in photosynthesis. (Visual/Auditory)

The teacher will hand out analysis questions to be answered and turned in to check for understanding. (Visual/Kinesthetic/Tactile)

The teacher will instruct the students to write a formal lab report.  The directions will be provided both verbally and as a document they can use for reference. (Visual/Auditory) 

The introductory sections of the lab report will have information on the leaf anatomy and its relationship to its function, specifically that chloroplasts contain chlorophyll which is responsible for capturing the sun’s energy for use during photosynthesis.  The conclusion and discussion sections of the lab report will have the students incorporate the information presented in the second part of the direct instruction lesson as they draw conclusions as to why the four pigments are necessary (to capture more energy).

 

 

 

Checks for understanding – directions, procedures, routines, and content (formative)

 

 

The teacher will check for understanding of instructions at every step by asking at least two students to repeat the instructions back for the class.

The teacher will check for understanding by engaging with the students as they work in groups doing the worksheet and the lab.

The teacher will hand out analysis questions to be answered and turned in upon completing the lab and the second part of the direct instruction.

The teacher will also ask students questions reflecting back on information that was presented earlier in the lesson at regular intervals through the lesson. 

  

Assessment – type and purpose

  

Summative:  The student will complete a lab report identifying the types of chlorophyll and accessory pigments observed in the leaf extraction. In the conclusion the student will discuss the importance of having more than one type of chlorophyll and accessory pigments.

 

Closure

  

The teacher will revisit the initial lab set up at the beginning of the lesson.  The students will discuss what they learned and reassess their predictions of what will happen to the plants based on their knowledge of the leaf structure.

  

Accommodations

  

Students with visual impairments will require assistance in the form of text to voice or Braille adaptations for the handouts and worksheets

Students with hearing impairments will need someone to sign the class discussions and lab video.  Other directions will be on the worksheets etc.

 

Materials

 

3 plants, petroleum jelly, cotton swabs, plant anatomy demonstration worksheet, PowerPoint slides, guided notes, worksheet, lab handout, lab analysis questions, coffee filters, variety of leaves, pencils, beakers, tape, isopropyl alcohol, coin, guidelines for writing a lab report, rubric

 Duration

 

3 to 4 days

 

 

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email: mlake001@mail.plattsburgh.edu
©2009 Mary Anne Lake
Last Updated 06 May 2010