9th Grade Poetry Lesson


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Laice Redman

EDU 512

Final Learning Experience

December 5, 2009

Grade 9: Poetry Unit

Learning Context: Poetry is an important part of learning ELA. Evidently, most students find poetry to be a gruesome part of the curriculum, but if educators approach poetry correctly, then students may not find it to be so painful. There are many different forms of poetry, and some are harder to understand than others. During this unit, students will be learning basic types of poetry, along with vocabulary often used in discussing in poetry. Learning basic types of poetry will prepare the students for more difficult types of poetry that they will be exposed to in the upcoming years of their high school career.

Standards Covered:

NYS Standards 2, 3,4:

- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression.Students will read and listen to oral, written and electronically produced texts and performances, relate texts and performances to their own lives, and develop an understanding of the diverse social, historical, and cultural dimensions the texts and performances represent. As speakers and writers, students will use oral and written language for self-expression and artistic creation.

-Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation.As listeners and readers, students will analyze experiences, ideas, information, and issues presented by others using a variety of established criteria. As speakers and writers, they will present, in oral and written language and from a variety of perspectives, their opinions and judgments on experiences, ideas, information and issues.

-Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction.Students will use oral and written language for effective social communication with a wide variety of people. As readers and listeners, they will use the social communications of others to enrich their understanding of people and their views.

NYS Standards for Art: Standard 1-Visual Arts

Key idea: Students will make works of art that explore different kinds of subject matter, topic, themes, and metaphors. Students will understand and use sensory elements, organizational principles, and expressive images to communicate their own ideas in works of art. Students will use a variety of art materials, processes, mediums, and techniques, and use appropriate technologies for creating and exhibiting visual art works.

Performance Indicators

Please note: The bold portions of the Learning Experience/Performance Indicators are what I am using for my focus.

- Read, view, and interpret texts and performances in every medium from a wide variety of authors, subjects and genres. (e.g., short stories, novels, plays, film and video

productions, poems and essays) (Standard 2)

- Distinguish between different forms of poetry, such as sonnet, lyric, elegy, narrative, epic, and ode. (Standard 2)

-Analyze and evaluate poetry to recognize the use and effect of-rhythm, rhyme, and sound pattern. Repetition, differences between language of the poem and everyday language of readers (Standard 3)

- Speaking informally with familiar and unfamiliar people, individually and in group settings (Standard 4)

- Maintain a portfolio that includes writing for social interaction (Standard 4)

-Produce comprehensive and well organized commencement portfolios of their work (Standard 1 from the Arts)

Assessments Plan:

Informal:

- Various homework assignments (Writing poetry, writing poetry based on a piece of art, reviewing terms and different types of poetry, etc.)

- Various in-class assignments (Analyzing poetry as a class, individually, and in groups)

- Exit Slips

- Journal Entries

Formal:

- Poetry Portfolio

- Quick Quiz

Poetry Portfolio Rubric

Outstanding

Looking for a PublisherGood

Poetry Editor is Reading Your WorkFair

Poetry Still Needs Some PolishingPoor

Back to the Drawing Board

Social Interaction

PI: Speaking informally with familiar and unfamiliar people, individually and in group settings

PI: Maintain a portfolio that includes writing for social interaction

-Student willingly read aloud all of his/her example poems during class time for the purpose of peer review.

-Student was able to speak as an individual and read his/her final poem aloud to the class.

-Student always gave warm and cool feedback to his/her classmate’s poems.

-Student maintained a portfolio of all of his/her poems through the course of the lesson to share with peers.

-Student wrote all five assigned poems.

-Student read aloud some of his/her example poems during class for the purpose of peer review.

-Student had some difficulty speaking as an individual while reading his/her final poem aloud to the class.

-Student gave some warm and cool feedback to his/her classmate’s poems.

-Student maintained a portfolio of some of his/her poems through the course of the lesson to share with peers.

-Student wrote four or less of the assigned poems.

-Student chose a single poem to read aloud during class for the purpose of peer review.

-Student stumbled a lot while reading final poem aloud to the class.

-Student gave either warm or cool feedback to his/her classmate’s poems but not both.

-Student maintained a portfolio with very few of his/her poems through the course of the lesson to share with peers.

-Student wrote three or less of the assigned poems.

-Student did not read any poem aloud for the purpose of peer review.

-Student would not read final poem aloud

-Student gave no feedback to peers.

-Student did not maintain a portfolio with his/her poems through the course of the lesson to share with peers.

-Student wrote 2 or less of the assigned poems.

Rhyme and Reason

PI: Analyze and evaluate poetry to recognize the use and effect of-rhythm, rhyme, and sound pattern. Repetition, differences between language of the poem and everyday language of readers-Student’s poem was well written, that is, it included many examples of poetry terms, and it had little to no spelling or punctuation errors.

-Student showed that he/she was able to recognize poetry terms and elements such as rhythm and rhyme, by using them only when appropriate and where they made the most sense within the poem.

-Student’s intensity of poetic language provided a rich and meaningful feeling. -Student’s poem was well written, that is, it included many examples of poetry terms, and it had a few spelling and punctuation errors.

-Student showed that he/she was able to recognize most poetry terms and elements such as rhythm and rhyme, and used them only when appropriate and where they made the most sense within the poem.

-Students intensity of poetic language needs work. -Student’s written poem needs work, that is, it included few examples of poetry terms and it had a few spelling and punctuation errors.

-Student showed that he/she struggled to recognize most poetry terms and elements such as rhythm and rhyme, and used them incorrectly or out of context

-Student exemplifies that he/she is not familiar with poetic language because it is nonexistent in his/her poem.- Students written poem needs to be seriously reconsidered, that is, it included no examples of poetry terms and it had many spelling and punctuation errors.

-Student showed that he/she cannot recognize any poetry terms and elements such as rhythm and rhyme. Student used them incorrectly and out of context.

-Student exemplifies that he/she is not familiar with poetic language because it is nonexistent in his/her poem.

Structure

PI: Distinguish between different forms of poetry, such as sonnet, lyric, elegy, narrative, epic, and ode.

. -Student’s written work exemplified that he/she knew all of the the guidelines for each specific type of poem.

-Student shows that he/she can clearly distinguish different types of poetry.

-Student’s written work exemplified that he/she knew most of the guidelines for each specific type of poem.

-Student shows that he/she can mostly distinguish between different types of poetry. -Student’s written work exemplified that he/she knew few of the guidelines for each specific poem.

-Student shows that he/she cannot distinguish between all types of poetry. -Students written work exemplified that he/she did not know any of the guidelines for each specific poem.

-Student shows that he/she cannot distinguish between all types of poetry.

Organization of Portfolio

PI: Produce comprehensive and well organized commencement portfolios of their work-Student included a cover page with his/her name, class period, date, and teacher’s name.

-Student’s included a table of contents.

-Student’s had all five poems neatly organized in a folder, or binder

-Student’s drafts were followed by final copies.

-Student work processed all poems

-Student included all first drafts and written peer and teacher feedback.-Student included a cover page with their name, class period, date and teacher’s name.

Student’s included a table of contents.

-Student’s had four poems organized in a binder or folder.

-Student’s drafts and final copies were somewhat organized.

-Student word processed all poems.

-Student included all first drafts and written peer and teacher feedback.-Student included a cover page without all the needed information.

-Student’s included a table of contents.

-Student’s poems were not organized properly in a folder or binder.

-Student’s were missing drafts/drafts weren’t followed by final copies

-Student word processed some poems, but not all

-Student included few drafts and some written peer and teacher feedback.-Student did not include a cover page.

-Student’s did not include a table of contents.

-Student’s poems were not properly organized and were not in a binder or folder.

-Student’s were missing drafts/drafts weren’t followed by final copies.

-There was no word processing.

-No drafts or feedback evident.

PI: Read, view, and interpret texts and performances in every medium from a wide variety of authors, subjects and genres. (e.g., short stories, novels, plays, film and video

productions, poems and essays -Student’s poems exemplified that he/she read all poems taught during class.

Student’s poems exemplified that he/she interpreted all poems taught during class. -Student’s poems exemplified that he/she read all of the poems taught during class.

-Student’s poems exemplified that he/she interpreted some of the poems taught during class. -Student’s poems exemplified that he/she read some of the poems taught during class.

-Student’s poems exemplified that he/she interpreted very few of the poems taught during class. -Student poems exemplified that he/she read none of the poems taught during class.

-Student’s poems exemplified that he/she interpreted none of the poems taught during class.

Day 1: Poetry Introduction- On the white board or SMART board the teacher will begin the class with a writing prompt. Students will need to write the answers to the questions in their journal. Students should respond to the following questions, 1.) Poetry is….2.) The subject/theme of poetry is...3.) I think poetry…4.) I wish poetry…. After the students complete the task, the teacher will ask students to share their answers. Students will have different responses and feelings about poetry and an open and lengthy discussion should be expected. The teacher should write student responses on the white/SMART board.

Day 2: Introduce terms often used in poetry such as, alliteration, personification, metaphor, simile, onomatopoeia, assonance, consonance, allusion, enjambment, rhythm, rhyme, rhyme scheme, verse, free verse, etc. This well help students in future classes as they are reading poetry.

The teacher will give students a graphic organizer to keep track of the definitions. Students will be put into groups and each group will be assigned three definitions to look up in dictionaries that are provided in the classroom. While the students are working in groups, the teacher should walk around the classroom and assist any groups that need help. Groups will be given fifteen to twenty minutes to look up words in the dictionary. Each group will read off their definitions and an example as the teacher writes it on the board for the other students to copy. As the teacher is writing down definitions and examples from the students, she should ask other students if they have any other examples to add. Homework: Have students write their own examples of at least six of the terms: three that they find difficult and three that they may need practice using. Students will hand in this assignment at the beginning of day 3.

Day 3- Haikus.The teacher will provide a definition of a haiku on the white/SMART board. It should be clear to students that a haiku is a poem that contains five syllables in the first line, seven syllables in the second, and seven syllables in the last. Students will focus on poems that are haikus for most of the class period. Poems they will review are by three Japanese writers, Basho, Issa, and Nastume. They will read the poems as a class. The teacher should clap to the beat of the poem as he/she reads it aloud so the students can cleary count the number of syllables per line.The teacher should put up a picture on the overhead of Catherine G. McElroy’s print of her “Frog Pond Painting.” (http://fineartamerica.com/featured/frog-pond-catherine-g-mcelroy.html) This will show students how poems can very easily be written while looking at art. Students will need to identify instances of poetry terms within the poem, such as examples of alliteration, personification, etc.

Homework: Students will write their own haiku (This will be a part of a major project towards the end of the lesson.) Students should focus the haiku of their choice on a piece of art.Students should find a piece of artwork that he/ she especially likes and then write their haiku based on the artwork. The art can be anything of their choice (i.e., famous artwork, picture in a book or magazine, CD/DVD cover, etc.) Students must bring in the art piece along with their poems to the following class period. The teacher should explain that poets sometimes write poems while looking at a piece of art or listening to a song. Poetry is a lot about feelings. Students should use a piece of art as a guide to their Haiku’s.

Day 4- Students will read their haikus, and their classmates will give them warm and cool feedback. Limericks: Students will focus on poems that are limericks. The teacher will put a definition of limerick poetry on the white/SMART board. Students will need to copy the definition down on their “Poetry Organizer” Worksheet.The limericks will be provided on the “Example Poems for in Class” worksheet. Students will be looking at poems from Edward Lear and William Shakespeare. They will read the provided poems as a class to make sure that each poem follows the specific guidelines for a limerick.

A limerick is a five line poem. The first, second and fifth lines rhyme, and the third and fourth lines rhyme. The first, third and fifth line lines have the same verbal rhythm and length, as do the second and fourth lines. The teacher should go over the rhyme scheme of each poem to add to the description of a limerick. While doing this the teacher will put the poems on the SMART board and will go over how to distinguish rhyme scheme with the class.

The teacher will then ask the students to help her with the rhyme scheme of the second poem as a class.

Homework: Students will write their own limerick, and bring it in the following day (This will be a part of a major project towards the end of the lesson.). Students will be given a “Quick Quiz “on day five to assess their knowledge of poetry terms, and different types of poetry. Students should study for the quiz by looking over their “Poetry Vocabulary” worksheet and their “Poetry Organizer” worksheet. Students will only be quizzed on information that has been discussed thus far.

Day 5-Quick Quiz on poetry terms and different types of poetry.Cinquains: Students will focus on poems that are cinquains. The teacher will have a definition of the type of cinquain the students will be studying. Students will need to copy information from the SMART board onto their “Poetry Organizer” worksheet. The particular cinquain should include, line 1 is one word/title, line 2 is two words that describe the title, line three is three words that tell the action, line four is four words that that express the feeling and line five is one word that recalls the title. In addition, the following information on cinquains should be on the SMART board.

Line 1: a one-word line, a noun, that gives the poem its title

Line 2: two adjectives that describes what the poem is about

Line 3: three action -ing verbs that describe something the subject of the poem does

Line 4: a phrase that indicates a feeling related to the subject of the poem

Line 5: a one-word line, noun, that sums about the poem is about, essentially renaming it

After the teacher goes over in great detail the definition and guidelines of a cinquain she will go over the cinquain written by Brenda Covert with the class. While reading the poem the class should be sure to recognize that the cinquain contains all elements that were provided on the SMART board. The teacher will ask student’s if/how/and why the poem meets the guidelines. After reviewing the poem by Covert, each student will pick a word out of a hat and use that word to write their own cinquain during the remainder of the class.

Homework: Students should finish their cinquains assigned in class if they haven’t already. In addition, students will write a cinquain using their own preferred topic and bring it to class on

Name:

Date:

Period:

Poetry Quiz:

Part I- Poetry Vocabulary. Please define each poetic word in a complete sentence and provide an example for each.

Alliteration:

Example:

Personification:

Example:

Onomatopoeia:

Example:

Simile:

Example:

Assonance:

Example:

Part II-Types of poetry. Please read each poem and tell me what type of poem it is and why.

By: Nastume Soseki

Over the wintry

forest, winds howl in rage

with no leaves to blow.

What type of poem is this?

What is your reasoning?

By: Edward Lear

There was an Old Man with a beard,

Who said, 'It is just as I feared!

Two Owls and a Hen,

Four Larks and a Wren,

Have all built their nests in my beard!

What type of poem is this?

What is your reasoning?

Day 6-Students will read their cinquains, and classmates will give them warm and cool feedback. Quizzes will be handed back and, students will have a chance to ask any questions. Lyric poetry warm up: The teacher should explain that lyric poetry is a lot like lyrics from a song because it expresses a person’s thoughts or feelings. Students will focus first on a song accompanied by a copy of printed out lyrics that can be found on the “Poetry Organizer” worksheet. The teacher will play the song “Real Love” by John Lennon. Students should follow along on their worksheets. After listening to the song played on YouTube, students will get into groups of three and locate any poetic devices (simile, metaphor, rhyme, etc.) in the song by circling them on the worksheet. Groups should also think about what the song writer’s thoughts were with information to back up their reasoning. This activity is to show students how similar music truly is to poetry. After about fifteen minutes, each group will share their answers with the class.

Homework: Students should find a song of their choice, as long as its school appropriate and locate as many poetic devices as possible by circling them. In addition, students should write a paragraph describing the song writer’s thoughts and feelings with information to back up their reasoning. Students should have this assignment in class on day 7.

Day 7: Students will share their lyric poetry with classmates.The teacher will draw a few names from a hat for participants. Lyric poetry continued: The teacher should have a definition of lyric poetry on the SMART board and students will need to copy it down. Lyric poetry expresses the thoughts and emotions of a single speaker. The class will then read Wordsworth’s “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud”. This should be done in “popcorn” style reading. However, the teacher must make it clear that students cannot stop reading until they see a proper form of punctuation because this could easily effect the meaning and tone of the poem. After reading the poem, students will find five questions posted on different parts of the wall in the classroom. Students will need to locate the five questions and answer them in their journals. Students should work independently on this assignment. After students have been given fifteen to twenty minutes to complete the task, students will share their answers.

Homework: Students should write a lyric poem on something/someone that plays a significant role in their life that impacts their feelings and emotions. Students will hand in their written lyric poem on day 8.

Questions for “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud” by Wordsworth:

1.) Find two similes in which the comparison is indicated by the word “as”. In each simile, what is compared to what? What is suggested by each simile?

2.) Describe the scene the speaker suddenly comes upon his wandering.

3.) According to the speaker, in what activities do the flowers take part?

4.) What was the speaker’s mood before he saw the daffodils? How do you know?

5.) Find three examples of personification in the poem. What human characteristics are given to non-human things?

Day 8-Students will hand in lyric poetry instead of reading aloud. Lyric poetry can be emotional and private to some, so it may be better if it is left unshared. Sonnets: The teacher will provide a definition on the SMART board of a sonnet. A sonnet is a fourteen line lyric poem that has three coordinate quatrains and a concluding couplet. The teacher should indicate the fourteen lines, the three coordinate quatrains and the concluding couplet on the SMART board where the poem will be displayed. Students will listen to a reading of the sonnet from Alan Rickman on YouTube. The class will then be handed the “Analyzing Sonnet” worksheet. Students will be given fifteen minutes to complete the worksheet with a partner they have never worked with before. This worksheet will be completed as an ENTIRE class and will be used as an exit slip. Each student must participate in some way. The teacher will go around the circle and ask each student a question from the worksheet or a question that pertains to the poem.

Homework: Students will write their sonnets for day 9.

Analyzing Sonnet 130

(Shakespeare)

1.Mark the rhyme scheme of the sonnet. This is dictated by the last word of each line. The first word is marked with an A. If the last word of the second line rhymes with the last word of the first line, it too is marked with an A. If it does not rhyme, however, it is marked with a B.

Example: Roses are red, A

Violets are blue; B

Sugar is sweet, C

And so are you. B

2.To the right of each line and on the blanks provided, write down what you think the line means. Put the lines in your own words.

3.Find one metaphor in the sonnet. Place a box around the metaphor.

4.Find one simile. Place a circle around the simile.

5.Sonnets have something called a turn. It’s where the author’s tone or meaning or topic seems to change a little. Where do you think the turn begins? Where in this sonnet does Shakespeare seem to change gears? (Hint: the turn usually begins the summation or overall meaning/point of the sonnet.

6.Assonance is the repetition of a vowel sound within a line or two lines of poetry.

Example: The cat sat sadly on the mat because he was mad.

Find two examples of assonance in the sonnet. On the line provided, write the line number and the words containing assonance. _________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

7.Alliteration is the repetition of a consonant sound within a line or two lines of poetry.

Example: The bad boy brought bugs and put them in the bed. (Note: the letter does not have to be at the beginning of the word.)

Find two examples of alliteration in the sonnet. On the line provided, write the line number and the words containing alliteration. _________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

8.In your opinion, what point was Shakespeare trying to make in this sonnet?

9. If you were the recipient of this poem, how would you feel? Why?

Day 9- Students who wish will read their sonnets aloud may do so. Students will prepare for a poetry reading. All students must participate. It's graded! Students will choose a poem that they have written or that is a favorite to read aloud to the class. Students will be put into groups depending on which poem they have decided to read (Students who would like to read their haiku/or a haiku that they have chosen will be put into a group with other students who would like to read their haikus, etc.) In groups, students will practice reading their poems aloud, correcting any errors they have come across, or change things based on class comments.

Homework: Students should practice reading their poems aloud for the poetry reading. Students will hand in all poems that they have written in a “Poetry Portfolio”,which will include the finalized poems and a one page written response stating why they chose the poem they read.

Day 10-Poetry Reading! Each student will read his/her selected poem at a podium in front of the class. This activity is meant to be fun, not stressful. But, it is important that students learn how to speak individually and in group settings. Students will be invited to bring in food and drinks to share, to lighten the mood. Students will hand in Poetry Portfolios for assessment.

Resources:

1.Teachers choice of poems:

Covert, Brenda. “Tree.” http://edhelper.com/ReadingComprehension_27_80.html. 4 November 2009. Used for Cinqauin lesson.

Issa, Kobayashi. “An old Silent Pond.” http://www.learnnc.org/lp/pages/3496. 4 November 2009. Used for the Haiku lesson.

Lear, Edward. http://www.poetry-online.org/limericks.htm.4 November 2009. Used for the quick quiz.

Lear, Edward. http://www.poetry-online.org/limericks.htm 4 November 2009. Used in the Limerick lesson.

Lennon, John. “Real Love.” http://www.stat.psu.edu/~mharan/reallove.html. 4 November 2009. Used in the Lyric Poetry lesson.

Shakespeare, William. “Othello.” http://www.examples-help.org.uk/limerick-poems.htm. 4 November 2009. Used for the Limerick lesson.

Shakespeare, William. “Sonnet 130”. http://www.learnnc.org/lp/pages/2890 4 November 2009. Used for the Sonnet lesson.

Soseki, Nastume. http://www.poemofquotes.com/famoushaiku/natsume.php. 4 November 2009. Used in the Haiku lesson.

Soseki, Nastume. http://www.poemofquotes.com/famoushaiku/natsume.php. 4 November 2009. Haiku example for the quick quiz.

Wordsworth, William. “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud.” http://www.schoollink.org/csd/pages/engl/lyticpoe.html. Used in the Lyric Poetry lesson

2. Student choice of song lyrics

3. Graphic Organizers (“Example Poems for in Class” worksheet, “Poetry Vocabulary” worksheet, and “Poetry Organizer” worksheet)

Bergtraum, Murry. “Writing Lyric Poetry.” http://www.schoollink.org/csd/pages/engl/lyricpoe/html. 4 November 2009. Used for Questions on “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud.”

“Composing Cinqauin Poems with Basic Parts of Speech.” http://www.readwritethink.org/lessons/lesson_view.asp?id=43. 4 November 2009.Used in Cinquain lesson.

“Example Poems for in Class Worksheet”-self created

“Poetry Organizers-self created

“Poetry Vocabulary Worksheet”-self created

“Sonnet 130: Rude or Reality?” http://learnnc.org/lp/pages/2890. 4 November 2009.Used for Sonnet 130 activity and “Analyzing Sonnet Worksheet.”

4. Pictures for Haiku’s (a picture from a famous piece of art, picture from a book or magazine, CD/DVD cover, etc.)

McElroy, Catherine. “Frog Pond Painting.” 4 November 2009. http://fineartamerica.com/featured/frog-pond-catherine-g-mcelroy.html.

5. Song lyrics of students choice.

6.) Computer for YouTube.

7.) SMART board/ White board

8.) Dictionary for poetry term definitions

Instructional/Environmental Modifications: Students with behavioral problems will be given “a cooling off” place (not in the same classroom).The teacher should be in frequent contact with students parents. In addition, the teacher should praise these students as much as possible so they continue doing good things. Teachers should speak quietly with these students, instead of embarrassing them in front of the entire class, if they are acting inappropriately, etc. Students with language processing problems should be given verbal and written directions to all assignments. Teachers should explain directions clearly and vividly, using appropriate language that this type of student will be able to easily understand. Teachers should call these students by his/her first name when addressing him/her. If a student happens to be blind, I would provide this particular student with an audio recording of the poems that we will be discussing. In this instance, the student can listen to the poems. In addition, if a student has a problem speaking in front of the class they can talk to me,and we will find a different activity for them. Maybe they could read their poem of choice in front of me only, instead of in front of the entire class. The class would be arranged so that the students are comfortable. The desks will be arranged in a circle so the class will be a “whole.” I will allow students to sit with whomever they want,as long as they stay focused. I think the most important part of a classroom is making sure that all students feel comfortable.

Time Required: This will be a unit plan (two weeks or ten school days). The teacher will plan for this particular unit at least a week before teaching it. The teacher will have all materials printed out and ready to go before the unit is started. Because classes may go quicker than expected, it would be perfectly acceptable to move on to the next day’s lesson if time allows. On the other hand, if classes tend to run slower than anticipated the teacher can always use part of day nine as time to catch up.

Reflection: There are so many different types of poetry that it’s hard to put your finger on what types are more important than others. They are all pretty equal. I tried to focus on types of poetry that would be “fun” for 9th grade students to analyze, but I also focused on poems such as sonnets and lyric poems that they would be dealing with in the future (grades 10 and up). Some terms in poetry,such as simile and metaphor,are used in all types of literature, not just poetry ,so this Learning Experience will be a good way to introduce students to these terms.Writing poetry can be difficult for some, but so much fun for others. Students can really put their own thoughts into writing poetry, and I think, once they get the hang of it, it’s not as painful as they may think.

Name:

Date:

Period:

Poetry Vocabulary

We will use this worksheet to write down poetry definitions. It will also come in handy as a study guide!

Alliteration:

Example:

Allusion:

Example:

Assonance:

Example:

Consonance:

Example:

Enjambment:

Example:

Free Verse:

Example:

Metaphor:

Example:

Onomatopoeia:

Example:

Personification:

Example:

Simile:

Example:

Rhythm:

Example:

Rhyme:

Example:

Rhyme Scheme:

Example:

Verse:

Example:

Name:

Date:

Period:

Poetry Organizer

We will write down what defines each type of poem. I will provide examples of each type of poem on a separate organizer.

Haiku Poetry:

Limerick Poetry:

Lyric Poetry:

Cinqauin Poetry:

Sonnet Poetry:

Name:

Date:

Period:

Example Poems for in Class

Haikus:

An old silent pond...

A frog jumps into the pond,

splash! Silence again.

By: Basho (1644-1694)

In my old home

which I forsook, the cherries

are in bloom

By:Kobayashi Issa

On New Year's Day

I long to meet my parents

as they were before my birth.

By:Soseki Natsume

Limericks

There was an Old Person whose habits,

Induced him to feed upon rabbits;

When he'd eaten eighteen,

He turned perfectly green,

Upon which he relinquished those habits

By: Edward Lear

And let me the canakin clink, clink;

And let me the canakin clink

A soldier's a man;

A life's but a span;

Why, then, let a soldier drink.

“Othello”, Act II Scene III

By: William Shakespeare

Cinquains

Tree

Sturdy, Tall

Climbing, swinging, playing

Fun among the branches

Maple

By: Brenda B. Covert

Lyric Poetry

Real Love

by John Lennon

All my little plans and schemes

Lost like some forgotten dreams

Seems like all I really was doing

Was waiting for you

Just like little girls and boys

Playing with their little toys

Seems like all they really were doing

Was waiting for love

Don't need to be alone

No need to be alone

It's real love

It's real, yes it's real yes it's real love

It's real

From this moment on I know

Exactly where my life will go

Seems like all I really was doing

Was waiting for love

Thought I'd been in love before,

But in my heart I wanted more

Seems like all I really was doing

Was waiting for you

Don't need to be afraid

No need to be afraid

It's real love

Yes it's real, yes it's real love

It's real.

"I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud"

I wandered lonely as a cloud

That floats on high o'er vales and hills,

When all at once I saw a crowd,

A host, of golden daffodils;

Beside the lake, beneath the trees,

Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

Continuous as the stars that shine

And twinkle on the milky way,

They stretched in never-ending line

Along the margin of a bay:

Ten thousand saw I at a glance,

Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.

The waves beside them danced; but they

Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:

A poet could not but be gay,

In such a jocund company:

I gazed---and gazed---but little thought

What wealth the show to me had brought:

For oft, when on my couch I lie

In vacant or in pensive mood,

They flash upon that inward eye

Which is the bliss of solitude;

And then my heart with pleasure fills,

And dances with the daffodils.

William Wordsworth

Sonnets

Sonnet 130

By: William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare (1564-1616)

Sonnet CXXX: My Mistress' Eyes are Nothing like the Sun

1. My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun; __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

2. Coral is far more red than her lips' red: ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

3. If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun; ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

4. If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head. __________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________

5. I have seen roses damask'd, red and white, ______________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________

6. But no such roses see I in her cheeks; __________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________

7. And in some perfumes is there more delight _____________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________

8. Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. __________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________

9. I love to hear her speak, yet well I know ________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________

10. That music hath a far more pleasing sound. _____________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________

11. I grant I never saw a goddess go: _____________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________

12. My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground. ______________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________

13. And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare _____________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________

14. As any she belied with false compare. _______________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________



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