Philosophy


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When I aim for a student to learn, I want him (or her) to not only fully grasp the subject, but to be able to contextualize it and expand upon it.

In social studies, especially history, a major component of study is remembering names, facts and dates. Another component, though, is how the student later uses it.

I look forward to working with adolescents and by the time they reach me in their education, they are preparing themselves to enter the world. Psychologically, they are forming their own identities and are looking for their particular places in the world. As their social studies teacher, my job is to prepare them to become an active, critical and competent consumer.

We teach them to not only be economic consumers in economics class (obviously), but to be civic consumers as well. In their later high school career, students are preparing themselves to become voters and active participants in their communities. We teach them how to analyze and interpret the media that they see, hear and watch and how to look at it thoughtfully and critically when they form their opinions.

I understand that these goals require more than the lecture-testing model. The students would need to be more active participants in their education. This could mean small class discussions, un-graded take home assignments (for the shyer students) that requires reflection and interactive projects.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Caitlin J. Keefe
ckeef002@plattsburgh.edu
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Last Updated June 5, 2014
© 2014 Caitlin J. Keefe